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Chadian soldiers ride on a truck in a large convoy of other Chadian soldiers who are fighting in support of Central African Republic president Francois Bozize, near Damara, about 70km north of the capital Bangui, Central African Republic Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013.
Chadian soldiers ride on a truck in a large convoy of other Chadian soldiers who are fighting in support of Central African Republic president Francois Bozize, near Damara, about 70km north of the capital Bangui, Central African Republic Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013.
(Ben Curtis/AP)

Robert Rotberg

The worst crisis you’ve never heard of: This 'non-state' is about to explode

Only urgent outside intervention from France, the former colonial power, or from the African Union and a broad-based coalition of African military forces, can save the Central African Republic (CAR) from itself. What is left of one of Africa’s poorest and most desperate countries will soon vanish unless French legions, African troops, or United Nations peace enforcers forcibly replace the Seleka (Alliance) rebel insurgents who today pretend to govern the Central African Republic and steal its diamonds and gold.