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Muslim Brotherhood supporters gather in front of Qubba Palace in Cairo on October 11, 2013. Thousands of ousted Islamist President Mohamed Morsi's supporters protested on Friday in the Cairo, Alexandria and other coastal and Nile Delta towns.
Muslim Brotherhood supporters gather in front of Qubba Palace in Cairo on October 11, 2013. Thousands of ousted Islamist President Mohamed Morsi's supporters protested on Friday in the Cairo, Alexandria and other coastal and Nile Delta towns.
(MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY/REUTERS)

Michael Bell

Why Obama suspended aid to Cairo: It’s about the neighbourhood

The Obama administration has suspended parts of its large-scale military aid to Egypt because of the new regime’s brutally harsh tactics aimed at supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood.

The military today appears to have gone beyond anything conceived by President Hosni Mubarak during his decades-long rule. The extent of the brutalism of General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi’s new regime in repressing the Brotherhood is remarkable. Over the past few months, Gen. al-Sisi’s insensitivity and seeming arrogance have struck senior American officials visiting Cairo. The forthcoming trial of deposed Muslim Brotherhood president Mohamed Morsi, set for Nov. 4, is the latest example of the military leadership’s determination to rule with an iron fist. The detention of John Greyson and Tarek Loubani focused Canadian perceptions of the harsh treatment even foreigners receive in running afoul of the authorities. Blood on the streets is the underlying harbinger.