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International Monetary Fund managing director Christine Lagarde watches as school girls attend a class in a computer room at Toutes A L'Ecole school in Kandal province, Cambodia, on Dec. 3, 2013.
International Monetary Fund managing director Christine Lagarde watches as school girls attend a class in a computer room at Toutes A L'Ecole school in Kandal province, Cambodia, on Dec. 3, 2013.
(REUTERS)

DOUG SAUNDERS

Why some countries are winning and others are losing in school rankings

It’s PISA day, and the world is freaking out. When the worldwide rankings of school performance were released this morning by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, you could watch the paroxysms of outrage and excitement sweep across the world’s time zones. The test results – which measure the academic results of 15-year-olds in math, reading and science – sparked instant celebrations in China and Singapore, national crises in Turkey, Britain, France and possibly even Canada.