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U.S. President Barack Obama pauses as he delivers remarks at an event held in observance of World AIDS Day at the White House in Washington, December 2, 2013.
U.S. President Barack Obama pauses as he delivers remarks at an event held in observance of World AIDS Day at the White House in Washington, December 2, 2013.
(KEVIN LAMARQUE/REUTERS)

DAVID SHRIBMAN

How Obama has fallen short of his greatest predecessor

The United States has just completed a weeks-long bath in Kennedy nostalgia and Kennedy commemoration, remembering the 35th president, celebrating his celebrity and glamor, re-examining his record, evaluating his presidency – and, inevitably, comparing him, unfavorably, to the 44th president.

But the tragic trip to Dallas that ended the John F. Kennedy presidency also began the Lyndon B. Johnson presidency, and comparisons, even more negative, between Barack Obama and the 36th president have dogged Mr. Obama since his inauguration. Far more than JFK, LBJ is the subject of a full-force gale of revisionism, and the new view of Johnson provides special perspective on Mr. Obama.