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A South Sudan army soldier sweats as he holds his weapon during a flight from the capital Juba to Bor town, 180 km (108 miles) northwest from capital, December 25, 2013. South Sudan troops have vowed to attack rebel stronghold if a ceasefire offered by the government is rejected.
A South Sudan army soldier sweats as he holds his weapon during a flight from the capital Juba to Bor town, 180 km (108 miles) northwest from capital, December 25, 2013. South Sudan troops have vowed to attack rebel stronghold if a ceasefire offered by the government is rejected.
(JAMES AKENA/REUTERS)

A handful of troops from Nepal: All that stands between South Sudan and imminent disaster

After a month of brutal fighting in South Sudan that has killed an estimated 10,000 people so far, the United Nations peacekeepers have finally got their first reinforcements: a small advance party of 25 soldiers from Nepal.

The cavalry was supposed to be charging into South Sudan to rescue it from imminent disaster, but it now seems that its arrival will be slow and much delayed. And even when the soldiers are all in the country, they are unlikely to be numerous enough to make a big difference.