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Mr. Harper and Northwest Territories Premier Bob McLeod. Completing an all-weather road to the Arctic coast has been on the northern wish list since the 1960s, when local residents began pushing for it.
Mr. Harper and Northwest Territories Premier Bob McLeod. Completing an all-weather road to the Arctic coast has been on the northern wish list since the 1960s, when local residents began pushing for it.
(Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press)

Nathan Vanderklippe

Inside Beijing's Arctic-affairs office: China wants a piece of the North

Stephen Harper wants only Arctic nations to have a say in managing the top of the world. China’s response: other countries also want to use the North, and they should have a say as well.

In an interview with the Globe and Mail last week, the Canadian Prime Minister made clear his opposition to non-Arctic nations playing a leadership role in the Arctic. Mr. Harper declared himself firmly against the idea that “the Arctic should be internationalized.” He did not specifically mention China, although his meaning was clear, given China’s increasing assertiveness in the Arctic.