The Globe and Mail

Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

In this Oct. 28, 2000 file photo, Cuba's President Fidel Castro, left, talks with Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez in Barinas, Venezuela, near Chavez's hometown of Sabaneta.
In this Oct. 28, 2000 file photo, Cuba's President Fidel Castro, left, talks with Venezuela's President Hugo Chavez in Barinas, Venezuela, near Chavez's hometown of Sabaneta.
(Jose Goitia/AP)

How Cuba’s invisible hand keeps a firm grip on Venezuela

The strange politics of Venezuela produce some startling anachronisms. Gas that costs less than tap water has kept enormous 1975 Buicks on the roads. Soft-focus photographs of the dear, departed leader beam down from the walls in public buildings.

And then there is Cuba.

The regime in Havana is viewed as a spent force, a historical relic, in the rest of the world, but Cuban influence in Venezuela is strong and growing.