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President Barack Obama waves to the media as he returns to the White House after an event in Pittsburgh, Pa., accompanied by Sen. Robert Casey, D-Pa., as they walk toward the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Wednesday Jan. 29, 2014.
President Barack Obama waves to the media as he returns to the White House after an event in Pittsburgh, Pa., accompanied by Sen. Robert Casey, D-Pa., as they walk toward the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Wednesday Jan. 29, 2014.
(Jacquelyn Martin/AP)

PAUL KORING

For Republicans, six is the magic number

For Republicans, the biggest election prize in this November’s mid-term elections would be to seize control of the Senate.

That would further squeeze Barack Obama turning him from a lame duck into a crippled one for his final two Oval Office years.

Control of both houses of Congress would give Republicans the power to pass legislation – for instance tax cuts or a populist version of immigration reform – forcing the president to either accept or veto measures that could hurt the Democrats in 2016. Losing control of the Senate would leave Mr. Obama exposed in a way that the Democrat majority there has protected him.