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A riot police stands guard outside a police academy, where the trial of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi and members of the Muslim Brotherhood is due to take place, on the outskirts of Cairo, February 16, 2014. Morsi appeared in court on charges of conspiring with foreign groups to commit terrorist acts in Egypt, in a further escalation of the crackdown against his Muslim Brotherhood.
A riot police stands guard outside a police academy, where the trial of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi and members of the Muslim Brotherhood is due to take place, on the outskirts of Cairo, February 16, 2014. Morsi appeared in court on charges of conspiring with foreign groups to commit terrorist acts in Egypt, in a further escalation of the crackdown against his Muslim Brotherhood.
(AMR ABDALLAH DALSH/REUTERS)

PATRICK MARTIN

Repression in Egypt: Who will they come for next?

Amr Hamzawy, an internationally respected political scientist, was born in Cairo during the rule of Gamal Abdel Nasser, grew up in the years of Anwar Sadat, graduated from university in the time of Hosni Mubarak and is likely to be imprisoned by the future administration of Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.

Two decades ago, Mr. Hamzawy, 46, garnered graduate degrees in Europe and worked in Washington and Beirut for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He returned to Egypt as the 2011 revolution was unfolding, wanting to help usher in real democracy.