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Protesters calling for higher wages for fast-food workers stand outside a McDonald's restaurant in Oakland, California December 5, 2013. The group, which numbered about 200, shut down the store for more than half an hour as part of a daylong nationwide strike demanding a $15 dollar minimum wage.
Protesters calling for higher wages for fast-food workers stand outside a McDonald's restaurant in Oakland, California December 5, 2013. The group, which numbered about 200, shut down the store for more than half an hour as part of a daylong nationwide strike demanding a $15 dollar minimum wage.
(Noah Berger/Reuters)

DAVID SHRIBMAN

Now that we know both sides of the minimum wage debate are right, what’s next?

A half century ago John F. Kennedy sowed an unsettling thought in the minds of American politicians: To govern is to choose. This winter Washington political figures are confronting a governing choice that is more complex than any of them contemplated when the issue first emerged.

On the surface the question seems deceptively simple: Should the American minimum wage, set at $7.25 in the first summer of the Obama administration, be increased in the sixth year of Barack Obama presidency to $10.10?