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A choir performs during an anti-war rally at Independence Square in Kiev, March 9, 2014. As the focus shifts to Crimea, observers wonder what will become of the Maidan - the nerve centre for the protests that drove former president Viktor Yanukovych out of office.
A choir performs during an anti-war rally at Independence Square in Kiev, March 9, 2014. As the focus shifts to Crimea, observers wonder what will become of the Maidan - the nerve centre for the protests that drove former president Viktor Yanukovych out of office.
(Konstantin Grishin/REUTERS)

Paul Waldie

With Yanukovych out, what is to be done with the Maidan?

It’s a dilemma all revolutionaries have to face sooner or later. What do you do when the revolution is over?

That’s a question now being posed at Kiev’s Independence Square, or Maidan, the site of three months of protests against Ukraine’s President Viktor Yanukovych. (Maidan is also a new shorthand for the protest movement). Since last December, thousands of people have stayed in the square day and night, facing off against government security forces over a network of elaborate barricades that cut off much of the downtown core. But with Mr. Yanukovych now gone, a new interim government in place and the world’s attention turned to the drama playing out in Crimea, what’s to become of Maidan?