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In this Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 file photo, activists evacuate a wounded protester during clashes with police in Kiev's Independence Square, the epicenter of the country's current unrest, Kiev, Ukraine. As questions circulate about who was behind the lethal snipers that sowed death and terror in Ukraine's capital, doctors and others told the AP the similarity of bullets wounds suffered by opposition victims and police indicates the snipers were specifically trying to stoke tensions and spark a larger, angrier clash between opposition fighters and government security forces.
In this Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 file photo, activists evacuate a wounded protester during clashes with police in Kiev's Independence Square, the epicenter of the country's current unrest, Kiev, Ukraine. As questions circulate about who was behind the lethal snipers that sowed death and terror in Ukraine's capital, doctors and others told the AP the similarity of bullets wounds suffered by opposition victims and police indicates the snipers were specifically trying to stoke tensions and spark a larger, angrier clash between opposition fighters and government security forces.
(Efrem Lukatsky/AP)

MARK MACKINNON

Recorded phone call about Kiev deaths fuels propaganda war

It’s a conversation that, if accurate, would mean the West needs to rapidly reinterpret what’s happening in Ukraine: In an audio recording posted online, the Foreign Minister of Estonia sounds like he’s suggesting that it was the country’s pro-Western opposition, not the security forces of the deposed Viktor Yanukovych, who used deadly ammunition against the crowds on Kiev’s Independence Square last month.