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The new port deal will increase trip rates for truckers and provide a minimum hourly rate for all hourly drivers. Container truck drivers travel through Port Metro Vancouver a day after a deal was reached to end a strike, in Vancouver, B.C., on Thursday March 27, 2014. The union and non-union truckers agreed to return to work and Port Metro Vancouver agreed to rescind all trucker licence suspensions where no criminal charges were laid against drivers. The federal government will increase trip rates by 12 per cent and wait fees for truckers at the ports will be increased. DARRYL DYCK FOR THE GLOBE AND MAIL
The new port deal will increase trip rates for truckers and provide a minimum hourly rate for all hourly drivers. Container truck drivers travel through Port Metro Vancouver a day after a deal was reached to end a strike, in Vancouver, B.C., on Thursday March 27, 2014. The union and non-union truckers agreed to return to work and Port Metro Vancouver agreed to rescind all trucker licence suspensions where no criminal charges were laid against drivers. The federal government will increase trip rates by 12 per cent and wait fees for truckers at the ports will be increased. DARRYL DYCK FOR THE GLOBE AND MAIL
(DARRYL DYCK/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)

COLIN ROBERTSON

Where’s Canada falling short in its plan to be a trade superpower?

Headlines over rail and terminal capacity to get western grain to market and the recent shutdown of Port Metro Vancouver are a reminder that trade and transportation go hand in hand. Saskatchewan’s Premier Brad Wall warned that Canada’s reputation as a “reliable supplier” has taken a hit.

We have work to do both in continuing to open markets abroad and in ensuring reliable trade routes within Canada.