The Globe and Mail

Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

In this Dec. 17, 2012 file photo, then New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks a news conference in New York where he and dozens of shooting survivors and victims' relatives called on Congress and President Obama to tighten gun laws and enforcement. The former New York mayor, a billionaire and advocate of firearms regulation, plans to spend $50-million this year setting up a new group that will mix campaign contributions with field operations aimed at pulling gun-control supporters to the polls. The new organization, Everytown for Gun Safety, will focus on women, especially mothers, The New York Times reported on its website, Tuesday April 15, 2014.
In this Dec. 17, 2012 file photo, then New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks a news conference in New York where he and dozens of shooting survivors and victims' relatives called on Congress and President Obama to tighten gun laws and enforcement. The former New York mayor, a billionaire and advocate of firearms regulation, plans to spend $50-million this year setting up a new group that will mix campaign contributions with field operations aimed at pulling gun-control supporters to the polls. The new organization, Everytown for Gun Safety, will focus on women, especially mothers, The New York Times reported on its website, Tuesday April 15, 2014.
(Seth Wenig/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS)

In U.S. gun-violence debate, it's Bloomberg vs. the NRA: 'We've got to make them afraid of us'

The National Rifle Association is a gorilla in American politics. It is large, fearsome and relentless. Any legislator who threatens its mission – making guns easier to buy, sell and carry throughout the country – can expect to pay a price at the polls.

Creating a counterweight to the NRA has long been a dream of gun-control advocates. If only, the thinking went, they had the resources and reach to punish or reward politicians the way their opponents did.