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Rev. Claudio Peppas at the Monastery of the Cross located in the Valley of the Cross in Jerusalem , April 2, 2014. The church is dated to the Byzantine Period . According to legend, the monastery was erected on the burial site of Adam's head and from there grew a holy tree, planted by Lot who used the branches Abraham gave him from pine, fir and cypress. It is believed that the tree provided the wood to the cross on which Christ was crucified.
Rev. Claudio Peppas at the Monastery of the Cross located in the Valley of the Cross in Jerusalem , April 2, 2014. The church is dated to the Byzantine Period . According to legend, the monastery was erected on the burial site of Adam's head and from there grew a holy tree, planted by Lot who used the branches Abraham gave him from pine, fir and cypress. It is believed that the tree provided the wood to the cross on which Christ was crucified.
(Heidi Levine For The Globe and Mail)

PATRICK MARTIN

Monastery unlocks great tale of the Holy Land

It looks like an old prison from the outside – high windowless walls, with the flag of Greece flying on top. For years I drove past it, without ever attempting a visit. But locked inside the Monastery of the Holy Cross, I recently found, is one of the great tales of the Holy Land, a story that attempts to tie the New Testament of the Bible to the Old Testament, and an illustration of the kind of sectarian conflict that has racked the Holy Land for centuries.