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Arvind Kejriwal, middle, of the Common Man Party,at a rally in Delhi, India, April 4, 2014. While Kejriwal has won support for his anti-corruption platform, his decision to step down early from a regional post to compete in India’s nation-wide elections may have been a losing gamble.
Arvind Kejriwal, middle, of the Common Man Party,at a rally in Delhi, India, April 4, 2014. While Kejriwal has won support for his anti-corruption platform, his decision to step down early from a regional post to compete in India’s nation-wide elections may have been a losing gamble.
(DANIEL BEREHULAK/NYT)

What happened to India’s anti-corruption party?

Everyone knew Narendra Modi and his Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) were going to triumph in India’s pivotal national elections. The only question was by how much. Likewise, everyone knew the incumbent Indian National Congress Party was going to get trounced – and again, the question was simply by how much.