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Supporters of Egypt's president-elect Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi wave national flags and his posters as they celebrate the official announcement declaring him the next president of Egypt in front of the Presidential Palace, in Cairo, on June 5.
Supporters of Egypt's president-elect Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi wave national flags and his posters as they celebrate the official announcement declaring him the next president of Egypt in front of the Presidential Palace, in Cairo, on June 5.
(Amr Nabil/AP)

Egyptian military’s miracle cure machines create a potentially tragic scandal

Of all the calamities that have befallen Egypt in the first three years of the Arab Spring, none have tested the citizenry’s legendary tolerance for absurdity more than the surrealist scandal that is KoftaGate.

Earlier this year, news of a history-altering medical breakthrough transfixed much of the country. In a press conference before dozens of uniformed officers, a doctor and Egyptian military general named Ibrahim Abdel-Atti announced that armed forces researchers had developed a device, called C-FAST, that can detect hepatitis C and HIV infections in patients instantly, externally and without the need to draw blood. God willing, the General told his audience, “you won’t find another patient suffering from hepatitis C after today.”