The Globe and Mail

Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

A man gestures in front of a burning barricade during a protest against French soldiers in Bambari May 22, 2014. At least three people were killed in the Central African Republic on Thursday as Muslims with machetes and rifles clashed with French peacekeeping troops trying to disarm rebels, a rebel spokesman said.
A man gestures in front of a burning barricade during a protest against French soldiers in Bambari May 22, 2014. At least three people were killed in the Central African Republic on Thursday as Muslims with machetes and rifles clashed with French peacekeeping troops trying to disarm rebels, a rebel spokesman said.
(GORAN TOMASEVIC/REUTERS)

GEOFFREY YORK

Canada can do more as Central African Republic nears ‘pre-genocide situation’

When I visited hospitals and war zones in the Central African Republic in late February, the fleeing survivors would sometimes tell me their dream. “Bambari,” they would whisper, hoping to reach a town of almost legendary peacefulness, where Muslims and Christians lived side-by-side as neighbours without conflict.