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A man holds a sign which reads " MH17 Victims Rest In Peace" during a candlelight vigil for the victims who were on board a Malaysia Airlines jetliner, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Saturday, July 19, 2014. Malaysia's transport minister said the country is "deeply concerned" that the site in Ukraine where the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down with 298 people onboard "has not been properly secured. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)
A man holds a sign which reads " MH17 Victims Rest In Peace" during a candlelight vigil for the victims who were on board a Malaysia Airlines jetliner, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Saturday, July 19, 2014. Malaysia's transport minister said the country is "deeply concerned" that the site in Ukraine where the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down with 298 people onboard "has not been properly secured. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)
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IAIN MARLOW

‘Why Malaysia?’ An anguished nation mourns a second air tragedy

On the weekend, they lowered the flags in Kuala Lumpur to half-mast.

The Malaysian Prime Minister called for the mainly Muslim nation to pray that they be protected from misfortune. There was grief and shock, and a special session of parliament called for this coming week.

For the second time this year, the people of this stable Southeast Asian nation have been sucked into the middle of a transfixing global tragedy.