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Russian President Vladimir Putin listens during a meeting in Samara, Russia, on July 21, 2014.
Russian President Vladimir Putin listens during a meeting in Samara, Russia, on July 21, 2014.
(ALEXEI NIKOLSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS)

DANNY LAM

With oil sanctions against Russia, anger about Flight 17 would resonate

The United States and NATO allies struggled to enact sanctions against Russia for the Crimean invasion and annexation and are divided now on additional sanctions for its role in the shoot down of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17. Limited sanctions have apparently been ineffective in moderating Russian behaviour to date, and Europe, struggling with high unemployment and fiscal constraints post-2008, is in a poor position to take a financial hit from sector-wide sanctions such as an arms embargo or risk an abrupt cut-off of Russian gas and oil supplies. Thus, resistance to additional sanctions is coming from the European Union despite the indignities on the victims of Flight 17.