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In this Monday, March 31, 2014 file photo, Al-Jazeera English producer Baher Mohamed, left, Canadian-Egyptian acting Cairo bureau chief Mohammed Fahmy, center, and correspondent Peter Greste, right, appear in court along with several other defendants during their trial on terror charges, in Cairo, Egypt. On Wednesday, July 23, an Egyptian judge released his reasoning for harsh sentences issued against three Al-Jazeera journalists, saying they were brought together “by the devil” to fake news reports with the aim of destabilizing the country.
In this Monday, March 31, 2014 file photo, Al-Jazeera English producer Baher Mohamed, left, Canadian-Egyptian acting Cairo bureau chief Mohammed Fahmy, center, and correspondent Peter Greste, right, appear in court along with several other defendants during their trial on terror charges, in Cairo, Egypt. On Wednesday, July 23, an Egyptian judge released his reasoning for harsh sentences issued against three Al-Jazeera journalists, saying they were brought together “by the devil” to fake news reports with the aim of destabilizing the country.
(Heba Elkholy/AP)

NADIA ABOU EL-MAGD

Why I’m not optimistic about the fate of the Al Jazeera journalists

I wasn’t hopeful about the verdict in the case of the three Al Jazeera English journalists – Peter Greste, Mohammed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed – who were sentenced by an Egyptian criminal court last month to seven years in prison plus three more years for Mr. Mohamed for possession of a single spent bullet casing he said he had recovered from a street protest as a souvenir.