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Ukrainian parliamentary deputies tussle during a session in parliament in Kiev July 22, 2014. Ukraine's parliament approved a presidential decree on Tuesday to call up more military reserves and men under 50 to fight rebels in eastern Ukraine and defend the border against a concentration of troops in Russia. After the vote, brief scuffles broke out between nationalist politicians and members of the party that was led by the former president, Viktor Yanukovich, who was overthrown in February.
Ukrainian parliamentary deputies tussle during a session in parliament in Kiev July 22, 2014. Ukraine's parliament approved a presidential decree on Tuesday to call up more military reserves and men under 50 to fight rebels in eastern Ukraine and defend the border against a concentration of troops in Russia. After the vote, brief scuffles broke out between nationalist politicians and members of the party that was led by the former president, Viktor Yanukovich, who was overthrown in February.
(Alex Kuzmin/REUTERS)

ANNA-SOFIA LESIV

Ukraine’s move to ban its Communist Party a step toward real independence

The excitement could be heard in his voice as the speaker of Ukraine’s parliament, Oleksandr Turchynov, on July 22 announced that “as soon as this law will be signed [by the President], I will announce the dissolution of the Communist faction.” It was, after all, Mr. Turchynov who back on May 18 asked the Ministry of Justice to consider banning the Communist Party.