The Globe and Mail

Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

U.S. President Barack Obama stands with U.S. Vice President Joe Biden before signing the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act at the White House in Washington July 22, 2014. The Obama administration’s political capital, already in decline, could be reduced even further if the Democrats fare poorly in November’s midterm elections.
U.S. President Barack Obama stands with U.S. Vice President Joe Biden before signing the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act at the White House in Washington July 22, 2014. The Obama administration’s political capital, already in decline, could be reduced even further if the Democrats fare poorly in November’s midterm elections.
(JOSHUA ROBERTS/REUTERS)

DAVID SHRIBMAN

Why Obama can’t afford to lose the midterms

Barack Obama has fought his last election campaign. His name is not on the ballot in this autumn’s midterm congressional elections. But do not for one moment think that Mr. Obama is not a factor in the 435 House races and 33 Senate races to be decided Nov. 4.

Indeed, Mr. Obama may have a greater stake in those fall elections than many of the contestants in those contests.