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Police and soldiers protect themselves with riot shields as supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi throw stones during clashes near Rabaa Adawiya square in Cairo August 14, 2013.
Police and soldiers protect themselves with riot shields as supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi throw stones during clashes near Rabaa Adawiya square in Cairo August 14, 2013.
(ASMAA WAGUIH/REUTERS)

A year after bloody massacre, Egypt still has low tolerance for dissent

On the one-year anniversary of the bloodiest massacre in modern Egyptian history, Human Rights Watch has published a detailed account of the government crackdown that left hundreds dead and forever changed the trajectory of Egypt’s Arab Spring.

The human rights group’s conclusion is simple: What took place on August 14, 2013 likely constitutes a crime against humanity – a crime for which, so far, nobody has been held accountable.