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A young boy pushes a bicycle towards the gate of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan compound in Bentiu, South Sudan, on Jan. 12, 2014.
A young boy pushes a bicycle towards the gate of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan compound in Bentiu, South Sudan, on Jan. 12, 2014.
(MACKENZIE KNOWLES-COURSIN/ASSOCIATED PRESS)

South Sudan: A deadlier crisis than Ebola, with no easy cure in sight

It may come as a surprise to those who are fixated on a scary-sounding disease in West Africa, but a much more horrific disaster is quietly gathering momentum in another corner of Africa with almost no attention from the world. And this one is a man-made catastrophe.

In terms of sheer numbers, the humanitarian emergency in South Sudan is far worse than the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. But the crisis in South Sudan lacks the dramatic images of hot zones, space suits, massive bleeding and mystery viruses. Instead it’s a more mundane mix of the usual factors: war, political killings, ethnic clashes, food shortages and egotistical politicians.