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Mothers from Honduras traveling with their children prepare to get into a U.S. Customs and Border Protection Services agent's truck after crossing the Rio Grande near McAllen, Texas. Thousands of unaccompanied minors are being dragged into the United States' dysfunctional governance, sudden poster children for a political age of paralysis and finger-pointing.
Mothers from Honduras traveling with their children prepare to get into a U.S. Customs and Border Protection Services agent's truck after crossing the Rio Grande near McAllen, Texas. Thousands of unaccompanied minors are being dragged into the United States' dysfunctional governance, sudden poster children for a political age of paralysis and finger-pointing.
(Rodolfo Gonzalez/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

JOE FRIESEN

In Southwest Texas, life revolves around the Mexican border

From the window of the Burger King where she works as a cashier, Tracy points to a modest, concrete building a few hundred metres away.

“You see that building over there? That’s Mexico, that’s the border,” she says, in Hidalgo, Texas.

For many in Southwest Texas, life revolves around the border. It’s here that the majority of child migrants from Central America are crossing into the United States, a situation that President Barack Obama has called a humanitarian crisis. But the mere mention of the border tends to drag in all kinds of other issues, from national security to immigration reform and the rise of Hispanic influence in the United States. Last week, Texas Governor Rick Perry, who controversially called in the National Guard to reinforce beleaguered border-patrol officers, suggested there was a “very real possibility” that terrorists from ISIL could have infiltrated the U.S. via its southern border.