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Two-month-old orphaned baby elephant Ajabu is given a dust-bath in the red earth after being fed milk from a bottle by a keeper, at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Elephant Orphanage in Nairobi, Kenya. The orphanage is seeing an upsurge in orphaned elephants because of a poaching crisis occurring across Africa.
Two-month-old orphaned baby elephant Ajabu is given a dust-bath in the red earth after being fed milk from a bottle by a keeper, at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Elephant Orphanage in Nairobi, Kenya. The orphanage is seeing an upsurge in orphaned elephants because of a poaching crisis occurring across Africa.
(Ben Curtis/AP)

ROBERT I. ROTBERG

Survival of elephants depends on global action

The African elephant, iconic, peaceful and innocently grazing, is being killed today in an unsustainable manner. Extinction is unlikely before 2050, but absent concerted global action to save vulnerable herds from Chinese-backed poachers, this century’s massive decline in elephant numbers will continue and could easily threaten the ultimate survival of the species.