Skip to main content

Former chief justice of Canada Beverley McLachlin sits in front of her portrait sculpture in Christian Corbet's studio in Sackville, N.B.

For Beverley McLachlin, life after the Supreme Court has been far from a bust. In fact, a portrait sculpture of the former chief justice of Canada is finally nearing completion. The commission by artist Christian Corbet (and undersculpted in part by his current protégé, Adam Milley) commenced in 2016 and has included three life-sittings. The final one took place last May at the artist’s Broadmoor Manor studio in Sackville, N.B. Corbet’s work is collected by more than 100 art galleries. He’s been formally given the personal title of Regimental Sculptor, after he was commissioned to create a bust of Prince Philip in 2013. He prefers to focus on “women of accomplishment” and has done portraits of the Queen Mother, Jane Goodall and Margaret Atwood. Soon, he can add Canada’s first female and longest-serving chief justice to the list. The life-size bust, pictured here in a near-finished state, is awaiting final instructions: Supreme Court staff are deliberating on what material in which to cast it. It’ll be a decision that lasts forever.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter