Skip to main content

Brian Hunter took the RBC contest’s top prize with a 2015 work, in oils on wood, titled Two empty trays mounted vertically.

Winnipeg artist Brian Hunter has won the 18th annual RBC Canadian Painting Competition, prevailing over 14 other finalists. Hunter, 31, was awarded a cheque for $25,000 Tuesday evening at a ceremony in Toronto at the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery.

Named as runners-up were Saskatoon artist Cameron Forbes and former Montrealer Nika Fontaine, now based in Berlin. Each received $15,000, while the remaining 12 finalists took home $2,500 each.

The juried competition, created in 1999 and organized by the Canadian Art Foundation, honours young and emerging Canadian painters. This year's 15 finalists – 10 women, five men – were chosen in early July from almost 570 submissions from across the country.

Story continues below advertisement

Hunter, who received a BFA from Montreal's Concordia University in 2007, took the contest's top prize with a 2015 work, in oils on wood, titled Two empty trays mounted vertically. The depicted trays are a pair of empty, antique letterpress boxes. "Once a tool to organize language, they now sit empty, their new-found purpose to exhibit their form," while simultaneously "lending a grid structure to the painting."

Choosing Hunter as the winner came after "passionate and heated deliberation," the nine jurors said in a statement published Tuesday. "Hunter's sophisticated work struck [us] as being both immediate and deeply considered, straddling a bridge between abstraction and representation in a compelling and seemingly effortless way."

Hunter's Two empty trays, 91 by 122 centimetres, along with Fontaine's Schnell Schnell 17 and Forbes's Maritime Plaza Hotel, Window Set 2, now becomes part of the RBC corporate art collection.

Works by all 15 finalists will be displayed at the Power Plant through Sept. 25 and again in the Metro Toronto Convention Centre as part of Art Toronto 2016, Oct. 28-31.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter