Skip to main content

Arts Artist Charlotte Prodger wins Britain’s Turner Prize with autobiographical film shot on mobile phone

Glasgow-based artist Charlotte Prodger won the 2018 Turner Prize on Tuesday, Britain’s prestigious contemporary art award, with an autobiographical film shot on a mobile phone.

For the first time, all four works shortlisted for the annual prize were films, organizers said, tackling “some of today’s most important issues, from queer identity, human-rights abuses and police brutality to post-colonial migration and the legacy of liberation movements.”

Prodger, who works with sculpture, writing and film, was awarded the 25,000-pound ($31,785) prize for the autobiographical BRIDGIT as well as another video.

Story continues below advertisement

Named after the Neolithic deity, BRIDGIT features snippets of Prodger at home or in the Scottish countryside, looking at her experience of coming out as gay.

Filmed over one year, it uses narration from Prodger’s diary as well as book extracts, looking at history and identity.

“I guess my work is quite personal and it’s becoming increasingly personal as time goes by,” Prodger told Britain’s BBC after winning the prize. “It is an honour but I would like my life to carry on as normal.”

The 44-year-old, who will represent Scotland at the Venice Biennale next year, join the ranks of past Turner Prize winners which include Damien Hirst, Anish Kapoor and Antony Gormley. The prize was established in 1984.

Report an error
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter