Skip to main content

Madeleine Thien is photographed at the Giller Prize Gala in Toronto, Ont. Nov. 11/2008.

Kevin Van Paassen/The Globe and Mail

Two Canadians are among 13 novelists nominated for Britain's prestigious Booker Prize for fiction.

Madeleine Thien of Vancouver and Canadian-born David Szalay got nods for their novels "Do Not Say We Have Nothing" and "All That Man Is" respectively.

Celebrated South African novelist J.M. Coetzee and U.S. Pulitzer Prize winner Elizabeth Strout are also among the contenders announced Wednesday.

Story continues below advertisement

Coetzee's "The Schooldays of Jesus" and Strout's "My Name is Lucy Barton" are among the best-known titles on a 13-book longlist that spurned big-name writers including Ian McEwan and Don DeLillo in favour of less famous authors and first-time novelists.

Coetzee, who lives in Australia, is the early bookies' favourite and would become the first triple Booker winner if he takes the prize. He won in 1983 with "Life and Times of Michael K" and in 1999 with "Disgrace."

Strout won the fiction Pulitzer in 2009 for "Olive Kitteridge," which was turned into a HBO miniseries starring Frances McDormand.

The eclectic list features four first novels — David Means' "Hystpoia," Wyl Menmuir's "The Many," Ottessa Moshfegh's "Eileen" and Virginia Reeves' "Work Like Any Other" — alongside established authors such as A.K. Kennedy for "Serious Sweet" and Deborah Levy for "Hot Milk."

There's also a rare nomination for a crime thriller, Graeme Macrae Burnet's "His Bloody Project."

Biographer Amanda Foreman, who chairs the five-member judging panel, said the books had "provoked intense discussion and, at times, passionate debate, challenging our expectations of what a novel is and can be."

Previously open to writers from Britain, Ireland and the Commonwealth, the Booker expanded in 2014 to include all English-language authors. Despite fears of U.S. dominance, there has not yet been an American winner of the prize, which usually brings the victor a huge sales boost.

Story continues below advertisement

Six finalists will be announced Sept. 13 and the winner of the 50,000 pound (C$86,000) prize will be named on Oct. 25.

Founded in 1969, the award is named after its sponsor, financial services firm Man Group PLC.

Report an error
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter