Skip to main content
//empty //empty

Naomi Klein, seen here in Toronto last Thursday, has just released her first book since The Shock Doctrine. TORONTO, ONTARIO: Sept. 11, 2014 - Canadian author Naomi Klein is seen here in Toronto Thursday Sept 11, 2014. Her new book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. Climate, will be released this coming week. (Tim Fraser for Globe and Mail) (For Arts & Life story by n/a )

Tim Fraser/The Globe and Mail

Only one day after arriving in stores, Naomi Klein's latest book has landed on the short list of the Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for Nonfiction.

This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate, Klein's first book since The Shock Doctrine was published in 2007, is nominated alongside Shopping for Votes: How Politicians Choose Us and We Choose Them, by Ottawa-based journalist Susan Delacourt; Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design, by Vancouver writer Charles Montgomery; Extreme Mean: Trolls, Bullies and Predators Online, by investigative journalist and broadcaster Paula Todd; and Boundless: Tracing Land and Dream in a New Northwest Passage, by Montreal novelist Kathleen Winter.

"It's a nice kick-start to the tour and the launch," said Klein.

Story continues below advertisement

The prizewinner receives $60,000, while each of the remaining finalists receives $5,000, making it the most lucrative award of its kind for works of non-fiction published in Canada.

This year's short list was selected by a jury composed of writers Merrily Weisbord, Priscila Uppal and Charles Foran; they considered 92 books submitted by 42 publishers from across Canada.

"I'm very, very happy with this short list – these are all wonderful books of stature – but I would say they're indications of it being a difficult time for non-fiction in Canada," said Foran. "It's hard to find the support to write a really major non-fiction book in Canada. I think the times make it hard."

He said there was "a notable absence of travel books" and "almost no biographies" among the submitted books.

"I can't help but note that myself. Possibly because I've written some of those big books, and I know what goes into them, and I know when it becomes difficult or impossible to write them," said Foran, whose biography of Mordecai Richler won the prize in 2011.

Continuing a tradition established two years ago, two additional jurors have been enlisted to help choose a winner, who will be announced on Oct. 14: CBC broadcaster Peter Mansbridge and filmmaker Deepa Mehta.

Former Globe and Mail correspondent Graeme Smith won last year's award for his book The Dogs Are Eating Them Now: Our War in Afghanistan.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies