Skip to main content

Books New writers, new winners: Here are the 2016 recipients of the $10,000 Kobo Emerging Writer Prize

The three winners of the second-annual Kobo Emerging Writer Prize, which highlights Canadian authors with a debut book published in 2015, have been announced in Toronto.

Each winner from the literary fiction, romance and non-fiction categories receives $10,000, along with promotional, marketing and communications support to help their careers.

Simon Fraser University molecular biology and biochemistry lecturer Irina Kovalyova won the literary-fiction prize for Specimen, a collection of short stories exploring the relationship between science and the human heart. Gail Anderson-Dargatz, author and literary-fiction judge, said she was "entranced" by the book.

Story continues below advertisement

"As at home in the experimental story as in a traditional narrative, she tackles the ordinary, the bizarre and the taboo with equal assuredness," Anderson-Dargatz said. "Reading Kovalyova's magical stories, I again felt that numinous, giddy joy I first experienced as a young writer discovering the endless possibilities found in narrative form."

The romance prize was awarded to Nova Scotia writer Nicola R. White for her novel Fury's Kiss, which tells the story of a woman living on Cape Cod who discovers she has strange powers. Author Lynsay Sands, judge of the romance category, said the novel was "original" and that White is "a natural storyteller."

CBC broadcaster Wab Kinew won the non-fiction prize for his memoir The Reason You Walk. Camilla Gibb, author and non-fiction judge, called the book "a gift to this country."

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • All comments will be reviewed by one or more moderators before being posted to the site. This should only take a few moments.
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed. Commenters who repeatedly violate community guidelines may be suspended, causing them to temporarily lose their ability to engage with comments.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.
Cannabis pro newsletter