Skip to main content
Access every election story that matters
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week for 24 weeks
Access every election story that matters
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

Matthew C. Klein, left, and Michael Pettis in a composite photo.

The Canadian Press

A book tracing the origins of today’s trade wars has won the Lionel Gelber Prize.

Jurors awarded the $15,000 honour on Tuesday to “Trade Wars Are Class Wars: How Rising Inequality Distorts the Global Economy and Threatens International Peace.”

This year’s winning title was written by Barron’s economics commentator Matthew C. Klein and Peking University finance professor Michael Pettis.

Story continues below advertisement

The authors argue that modern trade conflicts are often the product of decades of domestic policies that have exacerbated economic inequality.

Jury chair Janice Gross says in a statement that the book serves as a warning that the imbalances of the global economy are unsustainable.

Presented by the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs and Foreign Policy Magazine, the Lionel Gelber Prize is handed out annually to the world’s top English non-fiction book on international affairs.

The runners-up were “Killer High: A History of War in Six Drugs” by Peter Andreas; “Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism” by Anne Applebaum; “Isolationism: A History of America’s Efforts to Shield Itself from the World” by Charles A. Kupchan; and “War: How Conflict Shaped Us” by Margaret MacMillan.

The prize was founded in 1989 by Canadian diplomat Lionel Gelber.

Sign up for The Globe’s arts and lifestyle newsletters for more news, columns and advice in your inbox.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies