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Books Three literary ways to cool off in the next few weeks

LaHave River Books on the South Shore of Nova Scotia.

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Read

In case you didn’t know, Margaret Atwood’s The Testaments, the sequel to the 1985 bestseller, The Handmaid’s Tale, will be published Sept. 10. To get ready, forget the television series and concentrate on the original and (re)read the dystopian work.

Watch

Netflix has ordered up a second season of its adult animated series, Love, Death and Robots. The first season, which debuted earlier in March, featured short stories from science fiction authors such as Marko Kloos, Alastair Reynolds and John Scalzi.

Do

This year’s Writers at Woody Point festival, which runs from August 13-18 in Gros Morne, Nfld., includes Michael Crummey, Anthony De Sa, Linden MacIntyre, Meg Wolitzer and Megan Gail Coles. www.writeersatwoodypoint.com

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What are people on the South Shore of Nova Scotia reading?

LaHave River books has hosted Nova Scotia authors Amy Spurway and Anne Bishop.

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  • LaHave River Books
  • Co-owners: Gael Watson and Andra White

The building that now houses LaHave was built in 1896, overlooking the LaHave River on the South Shore of Nova Scotia. The bookstore is young – it’s celebrating its third anniversary this week – but the space is rich with history: It once housed a ship outfitter and a fish plant, and features a table that was crafted in the 1800s and came from Trinity College in Toronto. “Gael’s father-in-law was a dean there and in the sixties, when the Trinity was going to be refurbished, the table was going to be tossed,” White says.

LaHave’s bestselling author is local historian Joan Dawson.

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“Her father rescued the table and gave it to Gael and her husband at the time as a wedding gift. It made its way to LaHave – back in a library, of sorts, again.” LaHave’s bestselling author is Joan Dawson, a local historian who has written numerous books about the area. They’ve also hosted readings by Nova Scotia authors Amy Spurway, who wrote Crow, and Anne Bishop, who authored Under the Bridge. Watson’s bakery, housed in the same building, provided the cake.

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