Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism.
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Cancel Anytime
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
Just $1.99per week for the first 24weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); } //

In The Disciple, Aditya Modak plays Sharad Nerulkar, a man who has devoted his life to becoming an Indian classical music vocalist, diligently following the traditions and discipline of old masters, his guru, and his father.

Courtesy of Netflix

With about 90 per cent of Canadian movie theatres currently shuttered, there is comfort in knowing that, thanks to streaming and video-on-demand, we can all program our own double (or triple, or quadruple) bills at home. Here are this week’s best new under-the-radar digital releases

The Disciple, Netflix

One of the best surprises of last fall’s Toronto International Film Festival, Chaitanya Tamhane’s Mumbai-set film about the life of a classical music violinist living in the shadow of his father very quietly made its way to Netflix last week. I’m not sure why the streamer wasn’t throwing more promotional attention to the film, given how the decade-spanning drama instantly boosts the giant’s international prestige-cinema credibility, but I can’t pretend to know the ways of the algorithm-driven service. Either way, if you are looking for a cure to your endless scrolling this weekend, Tamhane’s meditation on tradition, focus, fame and the sometimes devastating folly of commitment is a wonderful way to spend a quiet evening at home.

The Killing of Two Lovers, VOD (including Apple TV/iTunes, Google Play)

In The Killing of Two Lovers, Clayne Crawford plays David, a man desperately tries to keep his family of six together during a separation from his wife, Nikki, played by Sepideh Moafi.

Courtesy of Elevation Pictures

The first minutes of Robert Machoian’s intense, stirring feature seem to give the events of the title away. But then the director unexpectedly pivots, and his story about a ne’er-do-well father (Clayne Crawford, excellent), his frustrated wife (Sepideh Moafi), their four young kids and the man (Chris Coy) who threatens to undo the entire family becomes something else entirely. Working with a low budget in the wide-open and often haunting spaces of Western Utah, Machoian creates a nervy, stripped down domestic drama that puts character first. Watch it with someone you love and trust – if they can get past the title.

Story continues below advertisement

Oxygen, Netflix

Alexandre Aja's French survival thriller Oxygen focuses on one single, easy-to-film setting: the inside of a cryogenic chamber.

Courtesy of Netflix

Director Alexandre Aja has spent the past few years finding horror in the water (Crawl, Piranha 3D), the woods (High Tension), the desert (The Hills Have Eyes), and in, um, mirrors (Mirrors). Now, with the French-language thriller Oxygen, the high-low French genre maestro goes all pandemic-era on us by focusing on one single, easy-to-film setting: the inside of a cryogenic chamber. It’s there where Liz (Melanie Laurent) awakens one day, completely unaware of how she got there and how long she’s been asleep. From there, Aja throws at least a half-dozen twists at Liz (and the audience), eventually turning the film into a “oh, c’mon!” kind of tease into an “okay, sure!” roller-coaster. Bonus: the always charming Mathieu Amalric voices MILO, the robot controlling Liz’s chamber and her only hope of escaping it.

Plan your screen time with the weekly What to Watch newsletter. Sign up today.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow the author of this article:

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies