Skip to main content
The Globe and Mail
Support Quality Journalism
The Globe and Mail
First Access to Latest
Investment News
Collection of curated
e-books and guides
Inform your decisions via
Globe Investor Tools
Just$1.99
per week
for first 24 weeks

Enjoy unlimited digital access
Enjoy Unlimited Digital Access
Get full access to globeandmail.com
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
Just $1.99 per week for the first 24 weeks
var select={root:".js-sub-pencil",control:".js-sub-pencil-control",open:"o-sub-pencil--open",closed:"o-sub-pencil--closed"},dom={},allowExpand=!0;function pencilInit(o){var e=arguments.length>1&&void 0!==arguments[1]&&arguments[1];select.root=o,dom.root=document.querySelector(select.root),dom.root&&(dom.control=document.querySelector(select.control),dom.control.addEventListener("click",onToggleClicked),setPanelState(e),window.addEventListener("scroll",onWindowScroll),dom.root.removeAttribute("hidden"))}function isPanelOpen(){return dom.root.classList.contains(select.open)}function setPanelState(o){dom.root.classList[o?"add":"remove"](select.open),dom.root.classList[o?"remove":"add"](select.closed),dom.control.setAttribute("aria-expanded",o)}function onToggleClicked(){var l=!isPanelOpen();setPanelState(l)}function onWindowScroll(){window.requestAnimationFrame(function() {var l=isPanelOpen(),n=0===(document.body.scrollTop||document.documentElement.scrollTop);n||l||!allowExpand?n&&l&&(allowExpand=!0,setPanelState(!1)):(allowExpand=!1,setPanelState(!0))});}pencilInit(".js-sub-pencil",!1); // via darwin-bg var slideIndex = 0; carousel(); function carousel() { var i; var x = document.getElementsByClassName("subs_valueprop"); for (i = 0; i < x.length; i++) { x[i].style.display = "none"; } slideIndex++; if (slideIndex> x.length) { slideIndex = 1; } x[slideIndex - 1].style.display = "block"; setTimeout(carousel, 2500); }

Adèle Haenel, left, and Noémie Merlant in a scene from Portrait of a Lady on Fire.

Neon

With movie theatres closed – and likely to stay that way in major cities until at least the fall – there is comfort in knowing that, thanks to streaming and video-on-demand, we can all program our own mini film festivals at home, focusing on whatever genre or theme we dang well please. This week, as the summer heat reaches its peak, let’s get hot and heavy with the best romance movies available for your streaming pleasure.

Portrait of a Lady on Fire, Crave with HBO Passionate, elegant and devastatingly romantic, Céline Sciamma’s Portrait of a Lady on Fire earns every right to slowly burn itself into your mind and heart. In 18th-century Brittany, artist Marianne (Noémie Merlant) is commissioned to paint the portrait of an Italian noblewoman’s reclusive daughter, Héloïse (Adèle Haenel, from Sciamma’s Water Lilies). Héloïse has so far rejected all artists who have come before her, in the hopes that her painted image cannot be sent abroad to potential male suitors, and Marianne enters her life in the guise of a mere hired companion. Soon enough – but with a deliberately cautious speed that suggests Sciamma’s narrative philosophy holds patience as a prime virtue – the pair disarm each other and form a bond intimate and profound.

Long weekend streaming guide: Reviews of the newest shows and films to stream

Christian Slater, left, and Patricia Arquette’s story of star-crossed lovers in True Romance is a hell of a ride, romantic and thrilling in equal measure.

Warner Bros.

True Romance, Netflix Finally available to stream in all its problematic glory, this 1993 movie works as both a nostalgic romp and a mind-blowing time capsule. Directed with a hardcore sensibility by Tony Scott and written to an inch of its life by a pre-Pulp Fiction Quentin Tarantino, True Romance is so filthy and politically incorrect that it would surely be “cancelled” were it to come out today. Yet the story of Christian Slater and Patricia Arquette’s star-crossed lovers (who are also certifiably nuts) is also a hell of a ride, romantic and thrilling in equal measure. And then there’s its supporting cast, which is stacked to an absurd degree: Christopher Walken, Dennis Hopper, James Gandolfini, Brad Pitt, Samuel L. Jackson, Gary Oldman, Val Kilmer, Chris Penn, Tom Sizemore and an all-time scenery-chomping bit from Saul Rubinek.

Story continues below advertisement

Jodie Turner-Smith as Queen in the Melina Matsoukas-directed Queen & Slim.

Universal Pictures/Universal Pictures / E1

Queen & Slim, Amazon Prime Video Toward the middle of Queen & Slim, one character jokingly greets our titular heroes as “the black Bonnie and Clyde.” And indeed, much of the film’s marketing has leaned on that easy-to-digest comparison, focusing on two innocent people who go on the run after one brutal encounter with a racist Detroit cop. But Lena Waithe’s screenplay is not a neat little narrative to be packaged and sold. It balances the passion of the lovers-on-the-run genre with the defiance of political resistance. And when Queen (Jodie Turner-Smith) and Slim (Daniel Kaluuya) come together and embrace their shared reality, the moment is freeing and glorious – the first love scene in some time where the passion feels earned, and the intimate physicality sincere.

Paterson, which stars Adam Driver as a bus driver and poet, has a lived-in intimacy that will leave you feeling calm.

Mary Cybulsky/Handout

Paterson, Kanopy Jim Jarmusch tends to make quiet, subdued and poetic films. Adam Driver does the same thing, just with 10 times the frequency. So it was natural that when the director and actor teamed up, the result would be compelling. And 2016′s Paterson is indeed highly watchable, but it’s as much a rambly Jamusch-ian character study as it is a loving portrait of a tiny romance. Following the relationship between Driver’s wannabe poet and Golshifteh Farahani’s artist, the film has a lived-in intimacy that will leave you feeling as calm as Driver’s stanza recitations (which is to say: very calm indeed).

Plan your screen time with the weekly What to Watch newsletter. Sign up today.

Follow related topics

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies