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Algonquin/Metis filmmaker Michelle Latimer’s feature documentary The Inconvenient Indian is benefiting from the National Film Board of Canada's Indigenous production funds.

Chris Young/The Canadian Press

The National Film Board of Canada says it has reached its commitment to spend at least 15 per cent of its production funds on Indigenous works – one year ahead of schedule.

The commitment was part of the NFB’s three-year Indigenous Action Plan, which was announced in June, 2017, in response to recommendations outlined in the report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

In sharing its second-year progress on the action plan, the NFB says production is under way or was recently completed on 40 works by Indigenous creators from across Canada.

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Those productions include Tasha Hubbard’s award-winning feature doc nipawistamasowin: We Will Stand Up, which is in theatres across Canada; Michelle Latimer’s feature doc The Inconvenient Indian, which is winding up production; and Alanis Obomsawin’s forthcoming documentary Jordan’s Principle.

The action plan was drafted in collaboration with an Indigenous advisory group and contains 33 commitments in four key areas: organizational transformation, industry leadership, production and distribution.

Last year, the NFB said that in the first year of its action plan, it backed 35 Indigenous-directed projects, representing 10 per cent of overall production spending.

The NFB also says Indigenous employees now represent 1.25 per cent of its staff, inching closer to a commitment to achieve 4-per-cent Indigenous representation across all sectors and levels of its work force by 2025.

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