Skip to main content
Complete Olympic Games coverage at your fingertips
Your inside track on the Olympic Games
Enjoy unlimited digital access
$1.99
per week for 24 weeks
Complete Olympic Games coverage at your fingertips
Your inside track onthe Olympics Games
$1.99
per week
for 24 weeks
// //

Burt Reynolds in 2007

Veteran actor Burt Reynolds is facing foreclosure on his long-time southeast Florida home, according to a lawsuit filed by a mortgage firm.

The 75-year-old is known for starring roles including in films Deliverance and Smokey and the Bandit from the 1970s. He also won a Golden Globe for his role as a porn king in the 1997 film Boogie Nights.

The mortgage on the house in Hobe Sound that is facing foreclosure was taken out in 1994, a year after Reynolds' widely publicized divorce from actress Loni Anderson.

Story continues below advertisement

Reynolds, who had heart bypass surgery last year, stopped making the mortgage payments a year ago and owes Merrill Lynch Credit Corporation almost $1.2 million, according to the lawsuit filed August 9 in Martin County.

Merrill Lynch also named two other financial institutions that might have an interest in the property.

A local newspaper reported in 2009 that Reynolds placed the 12,500 square foot, waterfront house, which he called Valhalla, on the market for $8.9 million.

The lawsuit lists a Little Rock, Arkansas, address for Reynolds. Neither the actor nor his manager could be reached for comment.

Report an error
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

If you do not see your comment posted immediately, it is being reviewed by the moderation team and may appear shortly, generally within an hour.

We aim to have all comments reviewed in a timely manner.

Comments that violate our community guidelines will not be posted.

UPDATED: Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies