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film review

Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s latest feature, the mesmerizing and lingeringly paced Cemetery of Splendour, picks up where Freud left off.

Freud waited for the turn of the 20th century to roll around before he released his Interpretation of Dreams. The watershed study of our unconscious drives heralded a new modern moment: All of a sudden, what happens when we sleep became worthy of reflection. Apichatpong Weerasethakul's latest feature, the mesmerizing and lingeringly paced Cemetery of Splendour, picks up where Freud left off. A gauzy dreamscape of life in a rural Thai hospital, Apichatpong's camera rests calmly on comatose soldiers and the quirky women who look after them. Nestling into the nooks of Thai superstitions and playing with both natural and LED light, Apichatpong, who rightfully won the Palme d'Or for his 2010 drama Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives, offers an enchanting interpretation of where our sleeping and waking minds wander.

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