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Film Reviews Fractured Land: Powerful doc pits First Nations’ concerns against B.C. LNG

Bright, articulate and charismatic, Caleb Behn supports protests, but goes to law school with the intention of fighting Big Oil and Gas in a different arena: the courts.

Fractured Land (2015)

3 out of 4 stars

Directed by
Fiona Rayher, Damien Gillis
Genre
Documentary
Classification
PG
Country
USA
Language
English

In British Columbia, where the government's love affair with liquefied natural gas and First Nations' concerns about the environment seem bound to come to a head, young lawyer Caleb Behn promises to be a force in this fracture.

From B.C.'s northeast, Behn fishes and hunts, but is as comfortable behind a laptop as he is on the land. Bright, articulate and charismatic, Behn supports protests, but goes to law school with the intention of fighting Big Oil and Gas in a different arena: the courts.

The documentary Fractured Land chronicles his struggle, and the film is powerful; a skillful study in landscape as well as character.

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The conflict unfolds visually – an industrial invasion of the pristine land: flames shooting out of flare stacks, endless piles of logged trees, enormous white oil tanks rising from the snow. In one heartbreaking scene, Behn assists after a pipeline maintenance crew finds a moose and her calf trapped in a sinkhole.

Meanwhile, the B.C. minister in charge of the file declares "we're going to change the landscape of British Columbia forever."

Not if Behn can help it.

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