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film review

The film’s bizarre, gore-soaked premise actually manages to ease viewers into the far more uncomfortable topic of grief.

Breaking up is hard to do, even more so when your girlfriend is dead and her corpse pops by to say hello every time you have sex with your new lover.

Such is the macabre premise of Nina Forever, a pitch-black comedy from British filmmakers the Blaine brothers, who make a startling feature debut with this tale about the perils of never letting go.

We first meet Rob (Cian Barry) at his lowest point: suicidal and heartbroken over the recent loss of Nina (Fiona O'Shaughnessy), who died in a car accident. But just as Rob's getting over things with the help of his young co-worker Holly (the superb Abigail Hardingham), along comes the bloody spectre of Nina, who's hanging around mostly to taunt the new couple, staining the bedsheets crimson while she's at it.

The film's bizarre, gore-soaked premise actually manages to ease viewers into the far more uncomfortable topic of grief – after all, dying is easy, but living with death is much more complicated.