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film review

Katherine Mitchell is played gracefully by Linda Thorson (of Sweet Liberty and The Avengers fame). Opposite her is Isaac Shapiro (a charismatic turn from the great character actor Stuart Margolin). He’s a grouchy retired tailor who fixes Mitchell’s hem and, eventually, much more.

Seniors have their moments in a small, agreeable romantic tale, in which a vibrant widow mouths the words to Verdi, but doesn't allow herself to experience the grand operatic passions she's in thrall with. She's Katherine Mitchell, played gracefully by Linda Thorson (of Sweet Liberty and The Avengers fame). Opposite her is Isaac Shapiro (a charismatic turn from the great character actor Stuart Margolin). He's a grouchy retired tailor who fixes Mitchell's hem and, eventually, much more.

They meet at a seniors home, a dead-end place she intends to leave as soon as she's back on her feet – she broke her hip – but where he has resigned himself to live out his days alone, aside from his regular poker games. The soundtrack is Mozart and Verdi, the tone is gentle and the themes of loneliness and second acts are handled deftly by co-writer/director Leon Marr.

Sinatra sang that it's more comfortable the second time you fall, Dean Martin sang "that's amore," and Yogi Berra said that it's not over until it's over. Those who get those references are bound to get this film.

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