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Director Paul Gross on the set of Hyena Road.

Christos Kalohoridis/Elevation

Such familiar homegrown names as Bruce McDonald, Helen Shaver, Jerry Ciccoritti and Paul Gross were among the filmmakers feted at Saturday night's 15th annual Directors Guild of Canada Awards.

The DGC, which represents more than 4,000 people in the country's screen-based industry, handed out 17 honours Saturday aimed to highlight the best directorial work in film and television over the past year. McDonald won best direction of a family series for his work on CBC's Heartland; Shaver took home an award for best direction of a dramatic series for her helming of the Vikings' episode Born Again; Ciccoritti won for best direction of a comedy series for Schitt's Creek; and Gross won best direction of a feature film for his war drama Hyena Road.

Other honoured productions included Guantanamo's Child: Omar Khadr, which tied for best documentary with Haida Gwaii: On the Edge of the World; the miniseries Sons of Liberty; and the mega-hit Orphan Black, which won for best production design on a television series as well as best picture editing for a television series.

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Meanwhile, Canadian film legend Anne Wheeler was awarded the DGC Lifetime Achievement Award. Wheeler is a veteran of the television industry, having directed episodes of everything from Da Vinci's Inquest to Bomb Girls to The Romeo Section. Wheeler also has a long history in feature films, having helmed dramas Better than Chocolate, Edge of Madness and the documentary Chi. (Last year's Lifetime Achievement Award recipient was David Cronenberg.)

At the other end of the spectrum, Quebecois filmmaker Chloé Leriche was honoured with the DGC Discovery Award for her feature, Avant les rues.

The DGC Awards were held at the Carlu in Toronto, and hosted by performer Arisa Cox.

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