Skip to main content
//empty //empty

Kristian Jordan and Hera Nalam star in I Propose We Never See Each Other Again After Tonight.

Brad Crawford/Courtesy of Mongrel Media

  • I Propose That We Never See Each Other Again After Tonight
  • Written and directed by Sean Garrity
  • Starring Hera Nalam, Kristian Jordan and Andrea Macasaet
  • Classification 14A; 102 minutes

rating

2.5 out of 4 stars


The new Canadian rom-com I Propose That We Never See Each Other Again desperately wants to be loved. You can sense that burning desire right from the film’s opening sequence, in which writer-director Sean Garrity treats Winnipeg as a delightfully romantic, if ridiculously cold, locale to get lost in. And the movie gets so, so close to achieving its goal of complete audience seduction and surrender, too. Right before it rips your heart out with a narrative turn that has to be seen to be (dis)believed.

Writer-director Sean Garrity has a big-hearted time exploring the cultures that make Winnipeg what it is.

Andrew Forbes/Courtesy of Mongrel Media

Things start off charmingly enough, with Iris (Hera Nalam) and Simon (Kristian Jordan) encountering each other after joining forces to push a car out of a snowbank, an incident that I can only assume is a traditional Winnipeg meet-cute. He’s a commitment-phobe who is carrying various emotional scars from his strict Mennonite upbringing, while she’s nursing the hurt of a soured long-term relationship, as well as the constant intrusions of her tight-knit Filipino family. Things go well enough – and Garrity has a fun, big-hearted time exploring the cultures and communities that make Winnipeg what it is – until they don’t.

Story continues below advertisement

Which is when the movie falls apart, with Garrity’s script turning a handful of misunderstandings into something of a gross slut-shame moment and urging his audience to feel sympathy for a man who, through his actions and inaction, reveals himself to be too-proud schmuck. If the film were interested in exploring the complexities of Simon’s immature persona, that would be one thing. But mostly, I Propose That... positions a dunce in the hero role and calls it a day.

Iris's Filipino family speak to her in un-subtitled Tagalog.

Brad Crawford/Courtesy of Mongrel Media

The film does get a tremendous boost from Nalam, though. The first-time actress is immensely charming, even when the script requires her character to trip over some implausible emotional traps. Her presence, and Garrity’s interesting-but-smart decision to have her family talk to her in un-subtitled Tagalog, almost compensate for the movie’s heartbreaking romantic philosophy.

I Propose That We Never See Each Other Again After Tonight opens Sept. 4 at the Cineplex Cinemas Mississauga and Cineplex Odeon Morningside Cinemas

Plan your screen time with the weekly What to Watch newsletter. Sign up today.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies