Skip to main content

Actor David Arquette's obsession with professional wrestling is the subject of the new documentary You Cannot Kill David Arquette.

Courtesy of Elevation Pictures

  • You Cannot Kill David Arquette
  • Directed by David Darg and Price James
  • Featuring David Arquette, Courtney Cox and Patricia Arquette
  • Classification R; 91 minutes

rating

2.5 out of 4 stars


Brutal honesty and even-more-brutal violence collide with the impact of a dozen body-slams in the new wrestling documentary You Cannot Kill David Arquette. Shot over the course of two years, the film follows the fascinating and dangerous obsession that the actor, best known for his role in the Scream franchise, has with the world of professional (and scarily amateur) wrestling. But though the doc is candid about the actor’s flailing career and the physical stakes of getting inside a ring, the doc regrettably misses an opportunity to explore the blurred lines of fact and fantasy that the WWE itself is built upon.

For those who haven’t tracked Arquette’s career since, say, 2011′s Scream 4, there might be a glimmer of surprise that the actor has made a (somewhat reviled) name for himself on the wrestling circuit. What started off as a promotional stunt for his long-forgotten 2000 comedy Ready to Rumble has turned into a full-blown commitment for Arquette, who is seeking the fame and rabid fanbase that Hollywood simply hasn’t bestowed upon him. (“At the present time, my career is pretty crappy,” he says to the camera.)

Story continues below advertisement

Arquette's affilliation with pro wrestling began with a promotional stunt for the 2000 film Ready to Rumble.

Courtesy of Elevation Pictures

This path gets very dark very quickly, with candid interviews from Arquette's actress sister Patricia and his ex-wife Courtney Cox revealing highly uncomfortable insights. Then there are the injuries that David inflicts upon his body, the societal embarrassment he undergoes in pursuit of his dream, and the backlash from more purist wrestling fans, who aren't too keen on welcoming an actor into their world of, um, actors.

It is riveting, deeply depressing stuff – and would be more engaging if co-directors David Darg and Price James had decided to explore the many similarities that movie-making and wrestling share, such as their devotion to putting on a highly fictional show. Instead, the pair mostly ignore that thematic angle in favour of brutal action and light comedy. Still, the film leaves a bruise as large as those stomped onto Arquette’s chest. Call it Scream 5: Ring of Terror.

You Cannot Kill David Arquette is available digitally on-demand starting Aug. 28

Plan your screen time with the weekly What to Watch newsletter. Sign up today.

Your Globe

Build your personal news feed

  1. Follow topics and authors relevant to your reading interests.
  2. Check your Following feed daily, and never miss an article. Access your Following feed from your account menu at the top right corner of every page.

Follow the author of this article:

Follow topics related to this article:

View more suggestions in Following Read more about following topics and authors
Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies