Skip to main content
film review

Start your weekend planning early with The Globe and Mail’s guide to every feature film arriving this weekend, from would-be blockbusters to under-the-radar indies

Hail Satan?

Open this photo in gallery:

Courtesy of Mongrel

  • Directed by: Penny Lane
  • Classification: 14A; 95 minutes

Rating:

3 out of 4 stars

Hail Satan? follows the Satanic Temple, a Salem, Mass.-based activist group who made headlines in 2014 after launching an online crowdsourcing campaign to fund a massive Satanic statue to be installed on the green pastures of Oklahoma’s State Capital building. The provocative move was a response to a similarly garish monument of the Ten Commandments, and was meant as a comment on Oklahoma’s unconstitutional yoking of the state to the (Christian) church. (Opens May 3 in Toronto and Vancouver, and May 10 in Montreal)

Long Shot

Open this photo in gallery:

Philippe Bossé/Entertainment One

  • Directed by Jonathan Levine
  • Written by Dan Sterling and Liz Hannah
  • Starring Seth Rogen and Charlize Theron
  • Classification R; 125 minutes

Rating:

3 out of 4 stars

Director Jonathan Levine’s hyper-comic fantasy tone is set from Long Shot’s very first scene, in which Seth Rogen’s half-baked journalist Fred Flarsky walks (or leaps) away from an accident that should kill any able-bodied man, let alone his wheezy stoner. Few of the moments that follow – including Flarsky’s many other brushes with death, right up to his burgeoning romance with Charlize Theron’s U.S. Secretary of State Charlotte Field – are intended to be remotely realistic. What’s more: Levine and Co. know that their central premise is far-fetched (read that title again), and they consistently lean into the ridiculousness of it with a contagious glee. (Opens May 3)

Mademoiselle de Joncquières

Open this photo in gallery:

Supplied

  • Written and directed by Emmanuel Mouret
  • Starring Cécile de France and Édouard Baer
  • Classification 14A; 109 minutes

Rating:

3 out of 4 stars

With the precision of a china painter decorating a Sèvres vase, writer-director Emmanuel Mouret sets up his proposition for the period piece Mademoiselle de Joncquières. Living in seclusion in the countryside, the beautiful widow Madame de La Pommeraye (Cécile de France) confidently resists the advances of the libertine Marquis de Arcis (Édouard Baer) but finally falls for the intense romantic companionship that he seems to offer. When he inevitably bores of her, she plots her revenge, using as her bait the apparently virginal Mademoiselle de Joncquières (Alice Isaaz). (Opens May 6 at the TIFF Lightbox in Toronto)

JT LeRoy

Open this photo in gallery:

Allen Fraser/Supplied

  • Directed by Justin Kelly
  • Written by Justin Kelly and Savannah Knoop
  • Starring Kristen Stewart and Laura Dern
  • Classification 14A; 108 minutes

Rating:

2.5 out of 4 stars

Director Justin Kelly’s attempt to demystify a bizarre cultural scandal, JT LeRoy has much in its favour: two top-tier performers in Kristen Stewart and Laura Dern, a Hollywood setting ripe for satire, and a deliciously weird-but-real tale at its core. Yet the film falls flat when it should bounce with surreal glee. Perhaps it’s because Kelly is only telling half a story here, with his film ignoring the motivations behind exactly why author Laura Albert (Dern) decided to make up a literary persona named “JT LeRoy,” and instead focusing on how she gently coerced her sister-in-law, Savannah Knoop (Stewart), into maintaining the ruse. (Opens May 3 in Toronto, Vancouver, and Edmonton)

Red Joan

Open this photo in gallery:

NICK WALL PHOTOGRAPHY/Courtesy of Mongrel

  • Directed by Trevor Nunn
  • Written by Lindsay Shapero
  • Starring Sophie Cookson, Judi Dench and Tereza Srbova
  • Classification 14A; 110 minutes

Rating:

2.5 out of 4 stars

Based on a Jennie Rooney novel of the same name and loosely inspired by the life of British KGB informant Melita Norwood, Red Joan is a soft-boiled spy film set at the dawn of the atomic age. Although the story sounds fascinating – subterfuge! centrifuge! pinkos! – the film is cold fusion. (Opens May 3 in Toronto and Vancouver; May 10 in Montreal)

The Intruder

Open this photo in gallery:

Dennis Quaid stars in Screen Gems' THE INTRUDER. Credit: Sony PicturesSerguei Baschlakov/SONY PICTURES

  • Directed by Deon Taylor
  • Starring Meagan Good, Dennis Quaid and Michael Ealy
  • Classification PG; 102 minutes

Rating:

2 out of 4 stars

The Intruder finds Dennis Quaid’s character, Charlie, a rugged and widowed retiree, selling his beloved family home to a young nouveau riche couple who’ve relocated from San Francisco, enchanted by the fantasy of solitude in the woods. Envisioning a life of serenity and fresh air, they assume Charlie will go away once the deal is signed and he’s no longer entitled to their property. (Opens May 3)

UglyDolls

Open this photo in gallery:

STX Entertainment

  • Directed by Kelly Asbury
  • Written by Alison Peck
  • Featuring the voices of Kelly Clarkson, Nick Jonas and Pitbull
  • Classification: PG; 87 minutes

Rating:

1.5 out of 4 stars

The best children’s movies tell a story first, and sell toys second. The new animated film UglyDolls is a lazy flip, its main intention to foster the toy-aisle bond between kids and its quasi-hideous title characters. Director Kelly Asbury’s 87-minute ad for David Horvath and Sun-Min Kim’s line of plush toys focuses on Moxy (voiced by Kelly Clarkson), a cheerful plaything who, along with her fellow factory-reject friends, spends her days pining to be purchased for a child. (Opens May 3)

Interact with The Globe

Trending