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These panels, taken from comics drawn by female artists, offer insight into the darker themes of everyday life

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Lesley Fairfield creates comics based on her experience battling an eating disorder.

Lesley Fairfield/Handout

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Lesley Fairfield creates comics based on her experience battling an eating disorder.

Lesley Fairfield/Handout

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Lesley Fairfield creates comics based on her experience battling an eating disorder.

Lesley Fairfield/Handout

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Lesley Fairfield creates comics based on her experience battling an eating disorder.

Lesley Fairfield/Handout

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MK Czerwiec draws on her experience as a nurse caring for patients with HIV/AIDS for her comics.

MK Czerwiec (Comic Nurse)/Handout

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A loved one with advanced, early-onset Parkinson’s disease first prodded Shelley Wall to share her experience in graphic form.

Shelley Wall/Handout

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A loved one with advanced, early-onset Parkinson’s disease first prodded Shelley Wall to share her experience in graphic form.

Shelley Wall/Handout

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A loved one with advanced, early-onset Parkinson’s disease first prodded Shelley Wall to share her experience in graphic form.

Shelley Wall/Handout

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Rosalind B. Penfold’s comic art captures the mindset of a woman in an abusive relationship.

Rosalind B. Penfold/Handout

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Sarafin began drawing comics while at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto.

Sarafin/Handout

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Sarafin began drawing comics while at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto.

Sarafin/Handout

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Years after the sudden death of her toddler son, Nicole Streeten turned her diary into a graphic novel.

Nicole Streeten/Handout

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Recognizing the popularity of Sandra Bell-Lundy’s Between Friends comic strip (above) and its spotlight on women’s issues, The Canadian Cancer Society invited her to create a special comic strip series to help them get the word out about the importance of mammography.

Sandra Bell-Lundy/Handout

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Recognizing the popularity of Sandra Bell-Lundy’s Between Friends comic strip (above) and its spotlight on women’s issues, The Canadian Cancer Society invited her to create a special comic strip series to help them get the word out about the importance of mammography.

Sandra Bell-Lundy/Handout

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Sarah Lightman’s comics chronicle her struggle to launch as her friends moved out and up.

Sarah Lightman/Handout

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Using cutouts and collage, Mita Mahato’s work stresses the value of storytelling in reshaping trauma and loss.

Mita Mahato/Handout

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