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An island in Tracadie harbour is about to become the Nova Scotia getaway for American movie stars Ethan Hawke and Uma Thurman and their two children.

The island's owner, Marie Kelly, confirmed Thursday that she is finalizing the sale of her 3.6-hectare island, which comes complete with two cottages and road access across a 60-metre land bridge.

She didn't divulge the price.

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The couple, whom she met through a mutual friend in the area, had discussed buying the island four years ago. But she didn't make the decision to sell until January when her family was no longer interested in keeping their summer home, purchased in the late 1960s.

"They loved it, and it was a magical place for them growing up, but families grow and move on," she said.

Tracadie is on the Gulf of St. Lawrence, east of Antigonish, N.S.

Hawke, an Oscar nominee for his role in Training Day in 2001, visited the Tracadie area in June. He is now on tour to promote his second book, Ash Wednesday.

He has also appeared on stage and on television, and in other movies such as Reality Bites in 1994 and Dead Poets Society in 1989.

Thurman is known for her 1994 lead roles in Even Cowgirls Get the Blues and Pulp Fiction, for which she received an Oscar nomination.

The first cottage on the property was an 1870s farmhouse summer kitchen hauled across the ice to the island in 1940, while a newer one was built in 1990.

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"It's a spectacularly beautiful spot," Kelly said.

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