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The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger consists of quirky heir Sean Lennon and quirky model Charlotte Kemp Muhl.

Acoustic Sessions The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger (Chimera Music)

The "beautiful boy" born to John and Yoko has made a beautiful record. The Ghost of a Sabre Tooth Tiger consists of Sean Lennon and paramour Charlotte Kemp Muhl, and together they make thoughtful, pretty music - acoustic music, as the album title suggests, all jaunty chansons, wordy sixties folk-pop and peppermint-scented light-psychedelia, some of it blissful and some of it rainier. Lyrics are whimsical. Instrumentation is delicately done, as if arranged by an artful florist. And if Beatle-y comparisons must be made, it's Paul McCartney's Michelle or George Harrison's sprightly slide-guitar that would come to mind. One suspects the most influential hand-me-down from Lennon senior was the forgotten stash of acid tabs tucked away in that big white piano.

And so, fantastical imagery abounds - these two cloud-reading unicorn-riders follow where love goes on the album-opening Lavender Road, a lilting French-pop number with Lennon and the breathy Kemp Muhl sharing cuddling, breezy harmonies. "Here we go, pulling up the curtains in the magic show/ heroes and ghosts sit in the front row."

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The album charms like a countryside circus. You wonder if the Hendersons will all be there, late of Pablo Fanque's fair - what a scene, you bet.

Both Lennon (a quirky heir) and Kemp Muhl (a quirky model) are billed as multi-instrumentalists and co-writers. Who knows where one starts and the other begins - the affair is one of acoustic guitars, with a gentle layering of shakers, cellos, banjos and accordions here and there. The six-string business is civil and tasteful.

Lyrics, as you would imagine from a duo with such an overthought moniker, are highly considered. Exhibit A, from the finger-picked and melodica-brooding Shroedinger's Cat: "From Socrates to Aristotle, man's greatest thoughts and deeds/ mere love notes in cheap beer bottles, floating out to sea." The couple that couplets together, and all that.

Lennon and Kemp Muhl are not above clichés, but their employment is not done lazily. Also from Shroedinger's Cat: "Like a tree that falls alone, in the woods without a sound/ Can't be sure that I exist, when you are not around." Sweet, right?

The album's more tuneful second half devotes itself to futuristic themes. The lysergic folk-pop duet of Dark Matter is all dark vibraphones and ground-control-to-Major-Tom vibe. The scrapyard protagonist of Robot Boy - he is composed of paper clips, refrigerator parts and microchips, with a heart of rubber bands and plastic toys - survives a flood to find someone of his own kind.

It's hard to say what the future holds for Lennon and Kemp Muhl, who told Vanity Fair their musical relationship was "like meta-lovemaking." Lennon, 35, has been something of a musical drifter, and the duo's next album, tentatively titled Victorian Cyborg, is an electric one. "We don't want to be huge pop stars," Lennon said in the same Vanity Fair piece. "We just want to be the artists we want to be, without limitations."

On Acoustic Sessions that freedom is not only evident, it is enviable.

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